Tim De Rose

Tim De Rose is a process-based artist that started his creative career as a potter, but has since devoted himself to painting. He is influenced by trees and forests around his home in Kingston, Ontario.

De Rose is influenced greatly by trees and forests, finding the locations to be intensely powerful. In exploring their quietness, he attaches meaning to them as symbols of people, relationships and languages. Deeply invested in the power of this subject matter, he comments on the open and unassuming way in which he approaches his work:

“I paint in a series with a style that is evolving all the time. I paint within that style until it lets me go. I don’t use any theories of colour, perspective or representative techniques for light and shade.”

Tim begins his process by photographing his arboreal subjects, looking for striking compositions and arrangements from which to base his painted works. From there, he begins drafting a complete line drawing to solidify his composition. To create depth with his medium, he adds as many as four layers of paint. Energetic textures and patterns begin to emerge by a meticulous etching and scraping away of these layers with a potter’s tool called a serrated kidney. In this part of his process, one can detect the essence of De Rose’s early roots in pottery.

Tim, in fact, began his successful arts career in the realm of pottery. As his skills in pottery grew, so did the range of projects he took on. These involved anything from hand building architectural sculpture, to ceramic wall panels. These clay canvases were etched, sculpted, and glazed in such a way that eventually they morphed into something approaching traditional paintings. In this way, one project leading to another, De Rose ultimately spent about thirty percent of the time painting. Around 1996, he came to realize how significantly painting was missing in his creative spectrum, and found that he enjoyed using the “different muscles of the process and the problem solving” that it involved. Tim affirms that he can’t say that he loves one art form more than the other, but has confirmed that after 45 years of pottery, he’s now determined to devote himself to painting full time.

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